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About This Course

This course explores all significant aspects of the immigration and naturalization process in the United States, including the Homeland Security Act of 2002 and the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996. Topics include worker and student visas, as well as Family Residence requirements, and the removal process.

Finally, the course covers citizenship and the requirements for an immigrant to become a citizen. Paralegals who plan to work in this challenging and demanding area will find the information gained in this course especially helpful in a rapidly growing specialty in the law.

Instructor: Christine Bolton

Expectations

You will be expected to spend an average of 8 hours per week reading and completing writing assignments. Please note that extensions will not be granted for this online course. 70% is the minimum passing score on all tests and assignments for this course. Students may consider working ahead in the curriculum if they have the time. Coursework in Immigration Law is equivalent to 45 clock hours of study.

Prerequisites

Successful completion of Paralegal I and II, or equivalent experience.

Course Books

Required textbooks for this course:

  • Immigration Law for Paralegals, Most recent edition, Durham: Carolina Academic Press, Maria Isabel Casablanca and Gloria Roa Bodin.

Highly Recommended Legal Resources:

  • Oran’s Dictionary of the Law, 4th Edition, by Daniel Oran. Clifton Park: Delmar Cengage Learning
  • WESTLAW, legal research access, available for the duration of the course for only $89. Order Online Now

For more information, call The Center for Legal Studies at 800-522-7737, or visit our Online Store to order.

Reading Assignments for Lesson Topics:

Lesson One: Introduction: Federal Power to Regulate Immigration and Visitors for Business and Pleasure

  • Read Chapters 1 & 2 in Immigration Law for Paralegals (IML)

Lesson Two: Visas for Temporary Workers and Temporary Visas for Students

  • Read Chapters 3 & 4 in IML

Lesson Three: Employment Based Temporary Visas for Particular Occupations and Investor Immigrant Preferences

  • Read Chapters 5, 6 & 8 in IML

Lesson Four: Family Based Residency and Visas; Claiming Asylum or Protection

  • Read Chapters 7 & 9 in IML

Lesson Five: Seeking Relief through Appeals and Citizenship

  • Read Chapters 10 & 11 in IML

Lesson Six: Post 9/11 Issues

  • Read Chapter 12 in IML

Writing Assignments:

For each lesson you will submit a 50 point short answer assignment covering the topics in that lesson’s reading.

Exams:

You will complete two exams. Each is worth 100 points. The Midterm exam is to be submitted with your Lesson Three Assignments; the Final exam is to be submitted with your Lesson Six Assignments.

Bulletin Board Assignments:

You will also post your responses to six class participation assignments. These assignments are referred to as Bulletin Board Submissions and will be submitted by either selecting Bulletin Board Submission from within the lesson material, or by selecting ‘Forums’ under Activities on the Left Hand Block.

All lesson objectives, assignments, and tests can be found in the Lesson Materials.

Grading

Your grade will be based on your completion of six writing assignment assignments, two exams, and class participation/Bulletin Board Submissions. The exams and writing assignments can be accessed from within the lesson material, or by selecting ‘Assignments’ under Activities on the Left Hand Block. You will have the opportunity to engage in “class participation” by using the Bulletin Board tool to respond to the bulletin board assignments throughout the course. Also, participating in the bulletin board assignments will enhance your understanding of the reading material.

Your final grade will be figured as follows:

  • The six writing assignments are worth 50 points each and comprise 40% of your grade.
  • The two exams are worth 100 points and comprise 40% of your grade.
  • Your participation in class participation assignments comprises 20% of your grade.

Withdrawal Policy

Students may drop the course with a full tuition refund less a non-refundable $15 administrative fee if written notice is sent to The Center for Legal Studies by email at [email protected] by the Wednesday before class begins. Students may drop the course with a 50% tuition refund if written notice is sent to The Center for Legal Studies by email at [email protected] anytime from the Thursday before the course begins until the first Thursday of class. After the first Thursday of class, no refunds will be issued.